MARK DEAN GARNER - 0411 353 693

24 Feb 2010

80% Conversion Rate!! I'd Like To See That

Seth Berman over at Post Click Marketing recently posted on how some large companies such as Mattel are getting an 80% conversion rate for some of their website properties.

Unfortunately he didn't say too much more, so I immediately chastised him for being such a tease and begged him to do an interview, share some slides or whitepaper with the companies in question.

He promised to do that, so stay tuned.

What Seth did add was that Mattel wasn't the only one getting such high conversion rates. He cited Mozilla and this page as another example.

This is the Firefox 4 download page See pics below.

My first reaction was: “Well, yeh, of course, that's what you'd expect from such a page.”

But after engaging my marketing and optimisation brain, I realised there was plenty we could all learn from Mozilla's page.

So here are my seven top tips of what you can learn from the Mozilla Firefox page.

1: Have a Clear Purpose

Both Mozilla and the people who come to this page know that the purpose of the page is to download Firefox 4. That's what the company wants and that's what the customers want. There's no messing around. Everyone's goals are aligned.

What You Can Learn From This

If you haven't already worked out your unique value proposition, point of difference, WIIFM for each page, then start now. Know what your customers want, then give it to them.

2: Only Drive Qualified Traffic to Your Site

As above, most customers coming to the site already want what the company is offering. There's a huge marketing lesson here.

Too many online marketing campaigns focus on driving huge volumes of vaguely interested traffic to a website. That is, they focus on volume instead of quality.

What the campaigns should be doing is only driving people who are interested and highly likely to take up the offer to your site.

That's a much more efficient use of your marketing budget and efforts.

This is the same for all high converting websites, such as Schwans and Market Day. That is, the majority of people going to these sites already plan to do business with them.

What You Can Learn

If you have a low conversion rate look at where your traffic is coming from and if it's actually interested traffic. If it isn't, get rid of it, change your marketing and start developing sources of traffic that are viable. That is: target your online advertising at people who are interested in your products and services.

Again, too much online advertising still uses the scattergun broadcast approach.

The web is not a broadcast medium, it's a direct medium. Look at who you directly want to communicate with, and then design your site and your online marketing  accordingly.

(On the other hand, if you do have viable traffic, then read on.)

3: Simplify Your Design

Everything about the Firefox 4 page is simple and easy to understand. It's a very clean design. It's all about the one product and there are no other distractions. Everything fits above the fold within the one screen.

This is something that far too many online businesses still don't get. They try to cram as much as they can onto every page, which ends up just confusing the customer and diluting the marketing effort.

What You Can Learn

Have a clean and simple design. Focus on one thing.

4: Have Clear Calls to Action

The call to action, the download button, is very clear. It's big and obvious, looks like a button and tells you what you get when you press it.

I'm not sure the left hand side is actually the best place to put it, I would have preferred right, but that's a minor quibble.

What You Can Learn

Big obvious calls to action.

5: Social Proof: Credibility. 44 million customers can't be wrong.

One of the key things all conversion rate experts, as well as most marketers, highlight time and time again is the need for credibility.

This is usually achieved through testimonials or recognised accreditations. And now online we have social proof, the number of tweets and likes etc.

In Mozilla's case they have over 44 million customers (downloads), and they promote that fact front and centre.

What You Can Learn

Highlight your testimonials or social proof.

6: Highlight Benefits

That is, stress the benefits not the features. Mozilla initially highlights three, although I'm not sure “even more awesomeness” is actually a benefit.

(Maybe they had Barney Stimson as their copywriter.)

But “super speed” is certainly a benefit.

Further down the page they also highlight other benefits such as personalization, security and speed (again).

What You Can Learn

Understand what benefit (value) your customers get from your product and write about it in their language.

7: Don't Get Fancy

My final point: Notice that there is no fancy multimedia, video or other annoying website techno candy on this page.

'nough said.

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